Tips for Conquering Twitter (Part 5)

( Check out our earlier tips: Involving your followersEngaging in converstionUsing keywords, and Tweeting original content)

Social media has become an inescapable part of companies’, organizations’, and individuals’ daily operations. Because it’s a quick, easy, and free way to get more online exposure (and because everyone else is doing it), most businesses and organizations simply can’t afford not to be on Twitter.

Because younger professionals are generally more comfortable with the Twitter platform, companies and organizations often entrust their Twitter presence to younger employees. This is a great opportunity to show your understanding of your company or organization: its mission, its strengths and weaknesses, and its values. If you play the Twitter game correctly, you can add real value to your team’s marketing campaign, and give your career a boost in the process.

Here’s our fifth tip:

5. Strategically repeat your most important messages.

-Not every Twitter user logs on every day, and no Twitter user logs on all day. To ensure that your followers do not miss your most important tweets, repeat them a few times a day for a few days.

-If it’s something really important, like information about new web content or an upcoming event, it’s OK to tweet about it three times a day for three days. The key is balance. The absolute worst thing you can do on Twitter is get pushy or spammy.

-Repeat your message, but don’t just keep sending the exact same tweet. Try communicating the message in a different way each time. Send one in the morning, one during lunch, and one in the evening. Use HootSuite for this.

-Each day, try to send each tweet an hour later or earlier than you did the day before, in order to capture audiences in different time zones.

-Hopefully, every individual follower will see at least one tweet and most followers will see a few of them (reminders don’t hurt). Even if an individual follower happens to see all nine, they will be spread out enough that they won’t cause annoyance.

( Check out our earlier tips: Involving your followersEngaging in converstionUsing keywords, and Tweeting original content)

Tom Swanson is the Programs and New Media Intern for the America’s Future Foundation, through the Koch Internship Program. Contact him at tom@americasfuture.org

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