August 7, 2019

AFF Community

Weekly Writers Round-Up: Medicare-for-All Costs, Questionable History, and Important Medical Advances

By: Josh Evans

Each week, we’ll be featuring opinion pieces from the alumni and current participants of AFF’s Writing Fellows Program. A few highlights from the past week are below. Do you dream of having bylines like these? We can help make those a reality. Apply now for our fall session of the Writing Fellows Program! Applications are open now through August 23!

Here’s The Truth About ‘Medicare-For-All’ by Andrew Wilford (Spring 2017) in The Daily Caller
The first round of Detroit’s Democratic presidential debate was dominated by discussion of health care reform. However, proponents of single-payer health care largely to square with voters about what “Medicare-for-all” would cost.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, in particular, struggled to be honest about what Medicare-for-all means. When former Maryland Rep. John Delaney took up the unenviable role of being the adult in the room and warned that Medicare-for-all meant that Americans would lose their private insurance, Warren claimed that this was a “Republican talking point.”…

WaPo Article Preposterously Claims Abraham Lincoln Was ‘Into Karl Marx’ by Elad Vaida (Summer 2019) in The Federalist
The Washington Post has seen better days. The newspaper that once brought us Watergate published an article last week titled “You know who was into Karl Marx? No, not AOC. Abraham Lincoln,” claiming that Lincoln and Marx were “friendly and influenced each other,” and that Lincoln had strong sympathies for socialism. The article distorts history, and relies on questionable evidence and flimsy anecdotes…

ALS Ice Bucket Challenge 5th anniversary by Robert Ordway (Fall 2017) in The Northwest Indiana Times
ALS research has come a long way in the past few years. While a cure has yet to be found, current research has slowed progression for many patients, giving them more time while the hunt goes on. In addition to those affected, survivors, family and friends should be optimistic that tomorrow will bring us ever closer to the answers needed to defeat ALS for good. My positive outlook is backed by the progress I have witnessed for over 15 years since my dad passed away from Lou Gehrig’s Disease in the fall of 2003…

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