September 20, 2013

Investing in Young Minds: AFF Discusses Energy and Growth with Dallas Young Professionals

By: Kathryn Shelton

Patrick Kobler, an AFF-Dallas board member and program coordinator at the George W. Bush Institute wrote up a summary of the AFF-Dallas Markets, Energy and The Environment event on September 11 on the Bush Institute’s blog (re-posted below). Original content is from this site.

Investing in Young Minds: AFF Discusses Energy and Growth with Dallas Young Professionals

Investing in Young Minds: The Bush Institute Discusses Energy and Growth with Dallas Young Professionals  - Blog Image

On the eve of The 4% Growth Project’s energy regulation conference, several Bush Institute fellows and staff gathered for a panel discussion on how the energy sector can power America’s economic growth.

Hosted by the Dallas Chapter of America’s Future Foundation (AFF) – a nonprofit that promotes the ideals of the free market system to area young professionals – the discussion attracted over 40 Dallas young professionals. Moderated by the Bush Institute’s Director of Operations Michael McMahan, who served in the U.S. Department of Energy under President Bush, panelists engaged in topics ranging from creating markets for environmental protection, to the effectiveness of proposed carbon taxes, and how liquefied natural gas exports could help the economy. The young professionals in attendance got a front row seat to experts from the field and a preview to the impactful discussions that would take place from dawn until dusk the following day at the Bush Institute conference.

The event included Q & A with three economic experts, including Bush Institute Research Fellow Matt Denhart, author of the recent Growth and Immigration: A Handbook of Vital Immigration and Economic Growth StatisticsBeyond his expertise on the impact of immigration on America’s economy, Denhart brought forth his research on energy and growth to stimulate an intense discussion about how regulation can be better structured to both achieve stronger economic growth and improve environmental quality.

Dr. Falaschetti, Executive Director of the Property and Environment Research Center and also a Bush Institute fellow, brought a unique perspective to the discussion with his background in environmental issues.  While many often consider advocates of the environment and proponents of the free market at odds, Dr. Falaschetti set the record straight:, “Good energy policy is green policy.”  Believing environmental resources and the growth of energy and markets can work in tandem, Dr. Falaschetti provided a fresh insight on the issues facing today’s energy sector.

The Bush Institute believes that its initiatives – designed to spread freedom at home and abroad – are  amplified when the Dallas community is involved.  This sentiment was echoed by panelist Bruce Bullock, director of the Maguire Energy Institute at the SMU Cox School of Business.  Specifically referencing the relationship between the Bush Center and SMU, Bullock believes the partnership provides students “the opportunity to meet the key [people] in city and government,” an opportunity that they “would not otherwise have.”

Last week’s event marked the third time this year that Bush Institute fellows and staff have presented before AFF Dallas, furthering President Bush’s belief that: “the marketplace is the best way to allocate resources.”  In February, Amity Shlaes, Director of The 4% Growth Project, met with the AFF Dallas to discuss her bestselling book Coolidge and in July Dr. Eric Bing, Senior Fellow and Director of  Global Health, met with the group to present free market solutions to global health issues, many of which are discussed in his recent book Pharmacy on a Bicycle: Innovative Solutions for Global Health and Poverty.

The promise of young minds inspires us to better every human life, and investing in young leaders creates an impact that will last far beyond our lifetime. The Bush Institute is honored to be a part of the Dallas community, and looks forward to investing in young minds through engagement with SMU and by partaking in action-orientated discussions with the city’s young professionals.

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